Cooper Hewitt Debuts “The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s”

“The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s” is now on view at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York. Highlighting a broad spectrum of design during the 1920s—including architecture, interior design, and decorative art—the exhibition was co-organized by Cooper Hewitt and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Textile, Tissu Simultané no. 46 (Simultaneous Fabric no. 46), 1924; Designed by Sonia Delaunay (French b. Russia, 1885–1979); Printed silk; 46.5 x 65 cm (18 5/16 x 25 9/16 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Museum purchase through gift of Friedman Benda, Elaine Lustig Cohen, Ruth Kaufmann, Patricia Orlofsky and from General Acquisitions Endowment Fund, 2012-2-1; Photo: © Smithsonian Institution

The multidimensional characteristics, bold colors, and forms that defined American style during this decade—in which jazz served to express an era of innovation—are on display throughout Cooper Hewitt’s galleries, populated with furniture, textiles, paintings, wallcoverings, and architecture.

Textile, Americana Print: Rhapsody, 1925; Designed by John Held Jr. (American, 1889–1958); Manufactured by Stehli Silk Corporation (New York, New York, USA); Silk, printed by engraved roller; 24.1 × 97.8 cm (9 1/2 × 38 1/2 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Gift of Marian Hague, 1937-1-3, Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Daybed, 1933–1935; Designed by Frederick Kiesler (American, b. Austro-Hungarian Empire 1890–1965); Birch-faced plywood, tulip poplar, nickel-plated steel; 96.5 × 116.8 × 127 cm (38 × 46 × 50 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Gift of Virginia Bayer, 2014-27-1-a/e; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

“Exploring the significant impact of European influences, the explosive growth of American cities, avant-garde artistic movements, new social mores and the role of technology, ‘The Jazz Age’ will seek to define the American spirit of the period,” said Cooper Hewitt Director Caroline Baumann. “Through an innovative interpretive presentation on the third-floor Barbara and Morton Mandel Design Gallery and a portion of the second floor, the exhibition will delight the eye, draw connections across media and present a new narrative for art and design in this vibrant era.”

Drawing, Study for Maximum Mass Permitted by the 1916 New York Zoning Law, Stage 4, 1922; Designed by Hugh Ferriss (American, 1889–1962); Black crayon, stumped, pen and black ink, brush and black wash, varnish on illustration board; 66.8 x 51 cm (26 5/16 x 20 1/16 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Gift of Mrs. Hugh Ferriss, 1969-137-4; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

Screen, ca. 1928; Designed by Donald Deskey (American, 1894–1989); Silver leaf, lacquered wood, cast metal (hinges); Right Panel: 198.1 × 46.4 cm (6 ft. 6 in. × 18 1/4 in.); Center Panel: 168.3 × 61 cm (5 ft. 6 1/4 in. × 24 in.); Left Panel: 153 × 46.4 cm (60 1/4 × 18 1/4 in.); Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum; Promised gift of George R. Kravis II; Photo: Matt Flynn © Smithsonian Institution

“The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s” is on view through August 20, 2017.

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