MoMA on the Modern Interior: “How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior”

Installation images of "How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior"

Installation images of “How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior.” The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

The Museum of Modern Art’s exhibition “How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior” investigates how materials, processes, and partnerships have shaped the modernist interior by refashioning a dozen full-scale interior spaces—including domestic spaces, exhibition displays, and retail interiors—divided into three chronological groupings from the late 1920s into the 1950s.

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Chair for the Villa Tempe a Pailla designed by Eileen Gray, 1935. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Curated by MoMA’s Juliet Kinchin, the exhibit’s aim is to underscore the ways in which trends are shown in material and spatial forms, and includes recent acquisitions by major women architects and designers, which include their own living spaces, along with the often overlooked areas of textile furnishings, wallpapers, kitchens, temporary exhibitions, and promotional displays. Featured partnerships include Lilly Reich and Mies van der Rohe; Aino and Alvar Aalto; Charles and Ray Eames; Florence Knoll and Herbert Matter; and Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier.

Reich, Lilly

View of the 1927 Velvet and Silk Café in Berlin by Lilly Reich. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

 

Herbert Matter. K(noll) Single Pedestal Furniture Designed By Eero Saarinen. c. 1957 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the designer. © 2016 Alexander Matter

Herbert Matter. K(noll) Single Pedestal Furniture Designed By Eero Saarine, 1957. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

The show includes over 300 pieces in its entirety and incorporates large-scale interiors such as Lilly Reich and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s 1927 Velvet and Silk Café, designed by Reich for a women’s fashion exhibition in Berlin; Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier’s kitchen from the Unité d’Habitation and study bedroom from the Maison du Brésil; and the 1948 Knoll furniture showroom in Manhattan, designed by Knoll and Matter.

How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior

“How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior.” The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior

“How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior.” The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

“How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior” is in view at MoMA in New York through April 23, 2017.

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