Exhibition of New York City’s Landmark Preservation History

Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks, an exhibition on view at the Museum of the City of New York honors the 50th anniversary of the Landmark Law of 1965. Following the controversial demolition of the original Pennsylvania Station, the law was signed to protect the buildings and places that represent the city’s cultural and architectural past. Tracing the origins of the legislation, the exhibition explores the history of New York City’s neighborhoods during the final decades of the 20th century. The collection of images and texts on display weave together a narrative of the buildings, streets, and cityscapes that have come to define modern-day New York.

Iwan Baan, Astor Place, 2014. Photo Courtesy of Iwan Baan and MCNY.

Iwan Baan, Astor Place, 2014. Photo Courtesy of Iwan Baan and MCNY.

Iwan Baan, Washington Street with Manhattan Bridge, 2014. Photo courtesy of Iwan Baan and MCNY.

Iwan Baan, Washington Street with Manhattan Bridge, 2014. Photo courtesy of Iwan Baan and MCNY.

Commissioned by the Museum of the City of New York, a curated assembly of present-day photographs by celebrated architectural photographer Iwan Baan illustrates the symbolism of the city’s landmarks, as they serve to reveal the vitality of New York neighborhoods while remaining rooted in the physical landscape of the built environment. The fundamental tenet behind the show unveils itself in the exhibition’s apparent inquiry into the merging of old and new. Highlighting the role of the architect in integrating the history of existing buildings with the innovation of new construction, the exhibition serves as a trajectory of New York’s preservation movement, with the architect playing a central role in creating the dynamic urbanism that is emblematic of contemporary New York.

Iwan Baan, Sylvan Terrace, 2014. Photo Courtesy of Iwan Baan and MCNY.

Iwan Baan, Sylvan Terrace, 2014. Photo Courtesy of Iwan Baan and MCNY.

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