Role of hotels in modern life examined in Vancouver exhibition

Every hotel tells a story about people and place, economies and contexts, with influences that are local and global. With that in mind, the exhibit Grand Hotel: Redesigning Modern Life examines the history of hotels as cultural phenomenon. The exhibition is on view now through September 15 at the Vancouver Art Gallery in Vancouver, British Columbia.

From the exhibition description: “The hotel is a universal and identifiable symbol, yet the diversity and individuality of its form and purpose is extraordinary. It is a space that combines the private and public realms and is intimately connected to a rich history of social and cultural change. Each hotel thrives (or fails to thrive) in a local context, and yet it is inextricably bound to a vast network of travel and movement that is without geographic boundaries. It is a fundamental architectural form deeply embedded in our culture, responding to the basic human need for shelter with dynamic designs, innovative forms and surprising insights into the nature of modern life.”

A wall-sized photo depicts a scene outside a Holiday Inn in the 1950s.

A wall-sized photo depicts a scene outside a Holiday Inn in the 1950s. On the ground, video screens show movies focused on road trips.

The exhibit has information on the background of historically significant hotels, such as the Waldorf=Astoria, Flamingo Hotel, and Hilton Istanbul.

The exhibit has information on the background of historically significant hotels, such as the Waldorf Astoria, Flamingo Hotel, and Hilton Istanbul.

photo-22

A model of the Bonaventure Hotel designed by John Portman is in the foreground in front of a wall that graphically portrays various well-known world hotels.

 

 

Comments are closed.